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30 Fabulous Photos of Harlem in 1995

In 1995, Harlem was a vibrant and dynamic neighborhood in New York City. It was known for its rich culture and lively community. The people of Harlem were diverse, with a strong sense of identity.  The streets were always bustling. People of all ages filled the sidewalks, going about their daily routines. Street vendors sold food, clothing, and music, adding to the lively atmosphere. Music was a constant presence, with sounds of jazz, hip-hop, and gospel blending together.

One of the major events in Harlem in 1995 was the opening of the Harlem USA retail complex on 125th Street. This new shopping center brought in big-name stores and provided a boost to the local economy. It was a place where people shopped, dined, and enjoyed entertainment.

The Harlem Meer, part of Central Park, was renovated in 1995. This restoration project included cleaning the lake and improving the surrounding park area. The Harlem Meer became a popular spot for families, with its peaceful scenery and opportunities for fishing and picnicking.

Harlem’s food scene was thriving in 1995. Soul food restaurants like Sylvia’s and Amy Ruth’s were favorites among residents and tourists. These establishments served classic dishes like fried chicken, collard greens, and cornbread. Dining at these restaurants was about more than just food; it was about community and tradition.

Education was a significant focus in Harlem. The Harlem Children’s Zone continued its mission to support local families. In 1995, the program expanded its services, providing educational support and resources to help children succeed in school. This effort was part of a larger push to improve the quality of life in Harlem.

In 1995, the Harlem community came together to celebrate the annual African American Day Parade. This event was a highlight of the year, with colorful floats, marching bands, and dancers. The parade celebrated African American culture and history, and it brought people from all over the city to Harlem.

#2 Graham Court, NE corner of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. at W. 116th St., Harlem, 1995

#4 Malcolm X. Blvd. between 115th St. and 116th St., Harlem, 1995

#5 NW corner of E. 125th St. at Madison Ave., Harlem, 1995

#6 E. side of Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. between W. 130th St. and W. 131st St., Harlem, 1995

#10 The Washington Irving, 205 W. 112th St., Harlem, 1995

#14 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. between W. 118th and W. 119th St., Harlem, 1995

#15 SW corner of 5th Ave. and W. 125th St., Harlem, 1995

#17 View NE along Frederick Douglass Blvd. from W. 126th St., Harlem, 1995

#18 W. side of Frederick Douglass between W. 151st St. and W. 152nd St., Harlem, 1995

#19 View west along W. 119th St. from St. Nicholas Ave., Harlem, 1995

#20 View west along W. 119th St. from Frederick Douglass Blvd., Harlem, 1995

#21 View SW along Malcolm X Blvd. from W. 114th St., Harlem, 1995

#22 View NE along Adam Clayton Powell from W. 128th St., Harlem, 1995

#23 View NW along Madison Ave. toward E. 118th St., Harlem, 1995

#24 View SE along Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. from W. 127th St., Harlem, 1995

#25 View west along W. 117th St. from St. Nicholas Ave., Harlem, 1995

#26 View NE along Manhattan Ave. from W. 120th St., Harlem, 1995

#27 View NE along 3rd Ave. toward E. 125th St., Manhattan, 1995

#28 View SW along Frederick Douglass Blvd. from W. 151st St., Harlem, 1995

#29 View SW along Frederick Douglass Blvd. from W. 151st St., Harlem, 1995

#30 NW corner of E. 116th St. at Park Ave., Harlem, 1995

Written by Wendy Robert

Brand journalist, Ghostwriter and Proud New Yorker. New York is not a city โ€“ itโ€™s a world.

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